Effective diagnostics of the causes of excessive hair loss and balding EHA – elemental hair analysis

Excessive hair loss is a problem that affects both women and men. Physiologically, we lose 50 to 100 telogen hair (hair in the resting stage) every day. If it’s more than this, we’re dealing with balding, which affects scalp hair, although not all areas of the scalp are equally susceptible to it. From the point of view of a functional medicine specialist, the most common causes of hair loss seen in the clinic are hypothyroidism (including atrophic Hashimoto’s thyroiditis), vitamin and mineral deficiencies (including iron, vitamin B12, folic acid, vitamin D3), omega-3 deficiency, active viral and bacterial infections (including Helicobacter pylori),

Zinc deficiency and supplementation

Zinc is one of the most-important trace elements in the body. It’s a component of over 300 enzymes and proteins, and plays a crucial role in the synthesis of steroid hormones. What products is it found in? Meat, seafood and whole grains are the richest source of zinc. It’s worth noting, however, that only 30% of zinc taken with food is actually absorbed. For men, absorption ranges between 8mg and 15mg per day, and for women, it’s approximately 8mg per day. With age, zinc absorption decreases even more, and even though zinc excretion decreases proportionally, remember to consume enough to maintain a safe balance.

How to remove aluminium from a child’s body?

Aluminium is a toxic metal that in terms of global presence, occupies third place among all elements on the periodic table. We can safely say that we are surrounded by it. This is why we should learn to recognise its sources in order to protect ourselves, particularly children, who are particularly exposed to the negative effects of this element.

We have contact with aluminium every day and in almost every situation. Ways it gets into the body include the digestive tract due to contaminated food products, and skin penetration through cosmetics that we use every day. Its source may be kitchen pots (including enamelled ones – if they have been damaged, they’re not safe) and canned drinks, which in the case of children, especially those with any diagnosed neurodevelopmental problem, must be completely eliminated.